Spoken Wood Podcast No. 175

January 26, 20122 Comments

Today’s episode was written by Robert Pridgen for his blog Little Good Pieces. It’s titled “The Greatest Blog Post Ever” and was originally posted December 9, 2011. To find more great posts like today’s, visit the Little Good Pieces blog at littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com.

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  1. Gary Bell says:

    I especially appreciated what Robert said about the medium. “We work in an imperfect material. Wood, being a natural product, has all sorts of variations in color, density, and grain”. That is precisely the point. I get the biggest kick/aggravation when I listen to newbie’s talking in terms of precision and thousandths of an inch. Come on. Really?! Your piece of wood will change that much from one day to the next. Wood is a fluid medium. What we do is try to catch it and shape it under its terms and our intent and when it works we call it “success” and when it doesn’t we call it a “learning experience”. Incidentally I think anyone who has been woodworking for less then 30 years is a newbie. [I’m woodworking off and on for over 50 years now] [wow where does time go?] We are always learning. Nice article Robert. Thanks Matt for bringing it to our attention.

    • Matt says:

      Your comment about people worrying over thousandths of an inch reminds me of sitting in a class with Chris Schwarz. He was discussing the construction of his toolbox and then stops to ask how many “engineers” were present.

      Half the class raises their hand, Chris then laughs or rolls his eyes. You can hear the gears turning as they try to comprehend what he talks about next lol!

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